A Time to Weep and a Time to Laugh

A Time to Weep and a Time to Laugh

Reading the Sayings of the Desert Fathers, I came across the following: A hermit saw someone laughing and said to him, ‘We have to render an account of our whole life before heaven and earth, and you can laugh?’ While this probably strikes most as curmudgeonly, for us Christians, a reference to the Last Judgment ought to inspire sober […]

‘What Would Jesus Do?’ and the Feast of All Saints

'What Would Jesus Do?' and the Feast of All Saints

This past Sunday was the feast of All Saints in the Holy Orthodox Church. On that day, we commemorate all the Saints of God, fruits of the sending of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, commemorated the Sunday prior. On this day we especially seek the intercessions of these holy men and women, and set them before […]

Orthodox Saints and the Ecumenical Movement

Orthodox Saints and the Ecumenical Movement

For Christians, the criterion of truth is fidelity to Christ and the faith that was “once for all delivered to the saints” (Jude 3). The Saints, being wholly united to Christ by the Spirit in his holy Church, in turn become the empirical datum par excellence by which truth is measured. This is why, for Orthodox Christians, […]

The Sanctifying Fire of Hell

The Sanctifying Fire of Hell

On Great and Holy Saturday, I was—by the grace of God—baptized into the Orthodox Church. At baptism, one is given a cross that he will typically wear (or at least keep somewhere close and safe) for the rest of his life. The cross that my godparents and I selected had Russian writing on the back. My godparents were […]

Ecumenism and Christianity Today

Ecumenism and Christianity Today

Christians confess a belief in one Church in the Nicene Creed. By this, it is believed that Christ founded a single, visible, historical community that is his Church, and he fervently prayed that the Church be one (John 17). If this is the case, why are there many different Christian churches, with a trend towards greater and […]

Guarding the Chalice

Guarding the Chalice

When a faith is highly traditional—so traditional that her Tradition is seen as nothing less than the presence of God living and breathing in the life of the Church—it is sure to clash with the sensibilities of a modern, critical, and pluralistic culture such as our own. One of the many sources of friction between the Orthodox Church […]

The ‘Kinesthetic’ Worship of the Orthodox Church

The Kinesthetic Worship of the Orthodox Church

In a recent post, Donald Miller—post-evangelical author of Blue Like Jazz—admits to not being much of a church-goer. Music and sermons don’t really do it for him, you see, as he is a ‘kinesthetic’ learner or a person who learns by ‘doing.’ There are also auditory and visual learners, who primarily learn by hearing and […]

With Fear of God, Faith, and Love, Draw Near

With Fear of God, Faith, and Love, Draw Near

And do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather fear him who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna. —Matt. 10:28 We ought to fear God. This might seem to be an obvious point given Our Lord’s clear commandment to do so, but in some of modern Christianity […]

Forgetting Christianity: Baptism, Sin, and the Devil

Forgetting Christianity: Baptism, Sin, and the Devil

Listen to this reflection on Ancient Faith Radio. – – – While baptism exorcises sin and the devil from the baptized, the Church of England has exorcised the language of sin and the devil from its baptismal rite. Instead of rejecting “the devil and all rebellion against God” and “repenting of the sins that separate us […]

An Orthodox Response to Feminism (Part 3)

An Orthodox Response to Feminism (Part 3)

When it’s correctly recognized that we are called to hold to the traditions that have been delivered to us by Christ and the apostles—one of the places where we are so called is 1 Cor. 11:2, just prior to the apostle’s discussion of male headship, examined in a previous post—then the problem with feminism and […]