Looking at Critical Scholarship Critically: A Response to Greg Carey

Looking at Critical Scholarship Critically

Recently, an article by Greg Carey, professor of New Testament at Lancaster Theological Seminary has been making the rounds. As I read it, I was stunned by the profoundly patronizing attitude displayed by the author towards conservative Christians. I was deeply disappointed at his misrepresentation of conservative responses to the issues he raises. Dr. Carey’s article […]

Mosaic Authorship and Misconceptions Regarding Source Criticism

Mosaic Authorship of the Pentateuch: Misconceptions About Source Criticism

In a previous post, I argued that Mosaic authorship was structurally significant for the Orthodox faith. I demonstrated that a non-critical acceptance of source criticism was no more amenable to Orthodox Christianity than it is to Protestantism. But before I provide my reasons for rejecting most source critical scholarship, I want to explore and reject poor […]

The Greek World of the Old Testament

The Greek World of the Old Testament

One of the interesting things about the Septuagint is the ‘world’ in which it was created. Completed over the course of the third, second, and first centuries B.C., the Septuagint (or LXX) is a Greek translation of the Hebrew scriptures. Beginning with Christ and the apostles (in the books of the New Testament), the Septuagint became […]

Building a Wall Around the New Testament

Building a Wall Around the New Testament

As with other dogmatic developments in the life of the Church, the canonization of scripture was largely done in response to heresy. For example, prior to Marcion (mid-second century), there was little activity on the part of the Church in establishing a closed ‘canon’ or rule of scripture. It was not until St. Irenaeus that […]

A Book of the People: Judaism and the Canon of Scripture

A Book of the People: Judaism and the Canon of Scripture

As is certainly the case today, Judaism was not a monolithic religion in the first century. Limiting ourselves to even the New Testament witness, there are various, competing sects—such as the Pharisees and Sadducees—who disagreed over everything from the resurrection to the proper interpretation of God’s law. Alongside these doctrinal differences was a debate regarding […]

The Signature of God

The Signature of God

Years before Jesus was ever born, the Holy Spirit inspired one of His prophets to tell the future, and to write down some things which had not happened yet. In this prophecy, we hear about someone who claims to be the Son of God, and who is tortured, and is condemned to a shameful death. […]

A Nestorian Canon of Scripture

A Nestorian Canon of Scripture

I have long been interested in the development of the biblical canon. I probably wouldn’t have found my way into the Orthodox Church without such studies. Recently, I found a 13th century canon defined by Nestorian Metropolitan Mar Abd Yeshua (ca. A.D. 1298). He apparently served as the chief bishop of Nisibia and Armenia for […]

Is the Septuagint a Divinely Inspired Translation?

Is the Septuagint a Divinely Inspired Translation?

It’s no secret that Orthodox Christians prefer the Septuagint (LXX) for their Old Testament. This stems largely from the apparent preferences of Christ, his Apostles, and their earliest disciples (the apostolic fathers). There are only five citations in the New Testament where a text identical to the Masoretic Text today is cited over-and-against the Septuagint […]

What’s Missing from “A New New Testament?”

What's Missing from 'A New New Testament'

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt recently published a new take on the Christian new testament, titled A New New Testament (ANNT hereafter). The publisher’s website gives some background on both its purpose and origins: Over the past century, numerous lost scriptures have been discovered, authenticated, translated, debated, celebrated. Many of these documents were as important to shaping early-Christian communities […]